Posts Tagged ‘RD’

Summer offers plenty of tasty fresh fruits and vegetables, but whether it comes from the local farmer’s market, grocer or even your own garden, produce may become contaminated with harmful pathogens that can cause food poisoning. As part of the Home Food Safety program, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods reminds Americans to safely enjoy produce with tips for buying, storing and preparing raw produce.

“One in six Americans gets sick every year from foodborne pathogens that you cannot see, smell or taste but are everywhere,” says registered dietitian and Academy spokesperson Sarah Krieger. “Eating any contaminated product – even produce labeled as organic or locally grown – can lead to food poisoning or even death.”

Each year, 3,000 Americans die from food poisoning. In 2011, listeria-contaminated produce caused the deadliest foodborne illness outbreak in nearly 90 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Harmful foodborne pathogens like E. Coli, salmonella, listeria and norovirus may contaminate fruits and vegetables from the soil or water or during harvesting.

“Fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy eating plan, and should fill half of your plate, but just like any food product, extra precautions should be taken to reduce the risk of food poisoning,” Krieger says.

“Avoid produce with mold, bruises or cuts as these are great places for bacteria to hide and spread rapidly to other places of the fruit. Buy loose produce rather than pre-packaged and if you do buy pre-packaged, it doesn’t hurt to wash bagged-lettuce or pre-washed carrots even if the bag claims they are ready to eat.”

According to Krieger, it is imperative to wash fruits and vegetables with cool tap water before eating or serving; dry with a clean cloth or paper towel to eliminate bacteria; and use a knife to cut away any damaged or bruised areas. It is also important to wash produce before peeling to make sure dirt and bacteria aren’t transferred from the knife to your fruits or vegetables.

“Cross-contamination can lead to food poisoning when juices from raw foods like meat, poultry or chicken come in contact with ready-to-eat foods like raw produce,” Krieger says. “Using two cutting boards and a color-code system can help: one color cutting board for raw meats; and the other for your fruits and vegetables.”

Just like any prepared dish, cooked fruits and vegetables can perish and lead to food poisoning upon consuming. Krieger advises discarding cooked vegetables after three to four days and to label leftovers with an “eat-by” date to know when food is no longer safe to eat.

Download the Summer Produce Safety tip sheet, and visit for additional safety tips on how to properly store your produce and reduce your risk of food poisoning.

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New name, same commitment to public’s nutritional health

CHICAGO – The American Dietetic Association, the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, has officially changed its name to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The change took effect January 1.

“The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has been in existence since 1917 as the American Dietetic Association, after working to feed the troops healthfully during World War I. Protecting the public’s health is the highest priority of the Academy and our members, and our new name complements our focus: the nutritional well-being of the American public,” said registered dietitian and Academy President Sylvia Escott-Stump.

“The name, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, promotes the strong science background and academic expertise of our members, primarily registered dietitians. Nutrition science underpins wellness, prevention and treatment,” she said.

“An academy is ‘a society of learned persons organized to advance science.’ This term describes our organization and immediately emphasizes the educational strength of our advice and expertise.”

“By adding nutrition to our name, we communicate our capacity for translating nutrition science into healthier lifestyles for everyone. Keeping dietetics supports our history as a food and science-based profession. Thus, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics quickly and accurately communicates our identity – who we are and what we do,” Escott-Stump said.

“Whether planning nutritious meals for children in day-care centers or schools, teaching individuals with diabetes about managing their blood sugar or saving lives with complex nutritional interventions after surgery, registered dietitians are the best qualified providers. The name change communicates that we are the nutrition experts,” she said.

The Academy’s award-winning website remains The colorful Eat Right logo will stay a part of the organization’s graphic identity. In addition, the ADA Foundation has become the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation.

“While our name has changed to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, we still have the same mission, the same powerful Eat Right message, and are still bringing the same quality nutrition advice to the table as we have for nearly 100 years,” Escott-Stump said.

“The field of nutrition has changed over this century, and we’re evolving to meet these needs—as the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.”

Just in time for Father’s Day, here’s some great advice from the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION on how to encourage the men in your life to take ownership of their health and nutrition.

When was the last time your father, brother, husband or partner cooked a meal, asked for a second helping of vegetables or did the grocery shopping? If recent trends are a guide, it happened recently, according to the American Dietetic Association.

“More than ever, men are playing a role in buying and preparing the food that is eaten in their household,” says registered dietitian Martin M. Yadrick, past president of the American Dietetic Association. “Not only is budgeting finances important, but men are also realizing the need for healthy calorie budgeting, too.

“Think of eating in terms of contributing to your 401k. Doing the right thing over time will make a huge difference down the road,” Yadrick says. “My advice is: Guys, take ownership of all your personal health needs.”

Registered dietitians say men’s questions, interests and needs regarding food and nutrition tend to focus on such areas as being healthier; looking good; performing at their best; having more energy; recovering from injuries and
learning how they can excel through healthy eating and activity habits.

For men of all ages and all stages of life, eating right and being physically active are as important to health as annual physical exams and visits to the dentist, Yadrick says.

“For men as well as women, good nutrition is vital, but a man’s nutrient needs are unique due to higher muscle mass, larger body size and hormonal differences.”

Men can serve as an example of healthful eating – at work or at home – by making smart foods choices when they’re around colleagues, children and spouses.

“Cut down on meat portions and fill up the extra space with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts and seeds,” Yadrick says. By including these foods on your plate every day, men can benefit their health and potentially stave off obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and dementia.

“You can stay healthy and active longer – and that includes your sex life and fertility – if you make good choices when you eat,” says Yadrick.

With research showing that making small dietary and lifestyle changes every day goes a long way toward improving your overall health picture for life, Yadrick encourages all men to jump aboard the eating right bandwagon.

“Adding nutrient-rich foods like fresh fruits and vegetables at every meal is a great step in the right direction. Cutting down on portion sizes can make a huge difference in your overall calorie intake,” Yadrick says.

“It’s the results that matter to men, and our taste buds and health can provide the proof that eating right pays off.”

To find a registered dietitian in your area and to learn more about men’s health and nutrition, visit

Happy Registered Dietitian day! I wanted to thank all of my colleagues who tirelessly get out the good news, everyday, about the benefits of eating healthy foods. And I thought I would celebrate this special day with the one food that dietitians have to defend the most – potatoes!

Please join honorary dietitian, Barbie, as she sets Ken straight on the health benefits of potatoes…with a little help from “Tot”. Enjoy!