Posts Tagged ‘soy’

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By David Grotto, RDN, LDN, author of The Best Things You Can Eat
This post is sponsored by SILK brand soy milk.

Though I’m a father of three daughters and know how soy consumption at an early age may have breast cancer protective benefits, I’m here to say that soy is not for women only! In fact, soy offers complete protein and a variety of essential nutrients that contribute to men’s health.

Good for the heart and every other part! Soy is good for the heart because it is high in soy protein and fiber, contains heart-healthy fats, micronutrients and antioxidants called isoflavones, and is low in saturated fat and cholesterol free. Whole soybeans are packed with fiber and healthy fats, and are rich in zinc, magnesium, iron and bone-building calcium. According to the FDA, consuming 25 grams of soy protein per day, as part of a healthy diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may help reduce the risk of heart disease. Soy helps fight heart disease by research shows lowering LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. You’ll also find that soy is one of the few plant sources of omega 3 fats, which have anti-inflammatory benefits throughout the body. Regular soybeans have soluble fiber that helps suck up cholesterol before it gets a chance to clog guys’ arteries. Fermented soy foods, like miso and tempeh, contain probiotics that have been found to be effective for lowering cholesterol, too!

Soy and testosterone. Andropause is a condition where men experience low levels of the male sex hormone, testosterone. Contrary to popular belief, not only does soy not lower soy protein, testosterone gets a boost from added protein in the diet. Ingesting high quality protein around the time of exercising has been shown to increase androgen binding sites (which attaches to testosterone) in muscle tissue. The volume of scientific studies also support that whole soyfood intake has no negative effect on erectile function, testosterone levels, reproductive hormones, sperm motility, or sperm quality. Scientific consensus supports soy as a part of a healthful lifestyle for both genders.

Diabetes: Adult diabetes is on the rise in both women and men. But the good news is that following a healthy lifestyle and calorie-controlled diet that includes whole soyfoods may help keep diabetes at bay. A research study found men who were given a dry roasted soybeans had significantly reduced fasting glucose and triglycerides in comparison with the control group. Also, the soybean supplement group showed enhanced antioxidant activity which may help protect against free radical damage in type 2 diabetes.

Other health benefits. A Chinese study found that soybeans added to the diets of healthy volunteers improved immune and brain function. Soy is an excellent source of the b-vitamin thiamine and is also a source of vitamin B-2 (riboflavin) folate. A large study found that those with higher levels of vitamin B-2 and folate in their blood had lower risk of colorectal cancer.
Some enjoyable and popular whole soyfoods include edamame; whole cooked soybeans; tofu, tempeh and soymilk. Here’s a popular smoothie that my guy patients really enjoy.

Soy Cherry Good!

Servings: 1
Ingredients:
1/2 cup lite vanilla SILK soymilk
2 tablespoons almond or peanut butter
1 cup frozen unsweetened cherries or strawberries
1 tablespoon agave syrup
1 teaspoon freshly ground espresso beans
¼ tsp vanilla extract
1 dash of nutmeg
1 dash of cinnamon
Directions:
Combine all ingredients in blender. Blend until smooth and sprinkle nutmeg and cinnamon on the top and serve.

References:

The Best Things You Can Eat‬: ‪For Everything from Aches to Zzzz, the Definitive Guide to the Nutrition-Packed Foods That Energize, Heal, and Help You Look Great‬. Da Capo/Life Long Books, January 2013. New York.

Yimit D, Hoxur P, Amat N, Uchikawa K, Yamaguchi N. Effects of soybean peptide on immune function, brain function, and neurochemistry in healthy volunteers.
Nutrition. 2012 Feb;28(2):154-9.

Eussen SJ et al. Plasma vitamins B2, B6, and B12, and related genetic variants as predictors of colorectal cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010
Oct;19(10):2549-61.

10 Best Superfoods for Men

You’ve heard that the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach — so is the way to a healthier body. In light of June being Men’s Health Month, here’s a list of 10 superfoods he should eat daily.

1. Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C, potassium, and the plant substance known as lycopene — great for heart and prostate health.

2. Broccoli is rich in natural cancer-fighting chemicals and loaded with heart-healthy, immunity-building nutrients such as vitamins A, C and folate — a B vitamin found to protect against heart disease. Preparation tip: Steam broccoli to help preserve vital antioxidants.

3. Salmon — whether smoked, canned, fresh-caught or frozen — is an excellent source of omega-3 fats, which help reduce inflammation and improve cholesterol.

4. Berries are “berry” good sources of nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium and anthocyanins, which are known to fight heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Rich in fiber and low in calories, berries taste great in salads or over breakfast cereal. Pick a color, any color!

5. Soy may boost prostate and bone health, research reveals. The Food and Drug Administration has also approved a claim that products made from soybeans, including meat substitutes and beverages, help improve heart health.

6. Olive oil is rich in oleic acid, a type of monounsaturated fatty acid that boosts heart health. It also enhances the absorption of lycopene (found in tomatoes), which may be helpful in reducing the risk of heart disease and prostate cancer.

7. Nuts contain fiber, healthy fats and plant nutrients called phytosterols, which are known to reduce LDL (bad) cholesterol and increase HDL (good) cholesterol. In a study featured in the medical journal Circulation, researchers found that eating a handful of almonds (about 1 ounce) daily reduced LDL by about three percent.

8. Green tea packs a group of antioxidants called polyphenols. These compounds may decrease plaque formation in the arteries and help fight prostate cancer cells.

9. Red wine contains a super antioxidant called resveratrol, found in the skins and seeds of grapes. Experts claim resveratrol assists in reducing LDL cholesterol and also helps in keeping the inside lining of the arteries that feed the heart more resistant to atherosclerosis, a.k.a. hardening of the arteries. Enjoy up to two 5-ounce servings a day, the American Heart Association suggests.

10. Whole grains, such as brown rice, oats, whole-grain breads and cereals may enhance immunity, reduce cholesterol and protect against a variety of cancers. The 2010 dietary guidelines recommend adult men consume six to eight one-ounce servings daily, with at least half of the grains being whole.

Food should be your primary source of nutrients, but most guys don’t eat an optimal diet every day. Your backup plan: take a multivitamin. Choose one designed for men’s needs. It should pack eleven milligrams of zinc and 600 IUs of vitamin D, two important players in prostate health. Since guys don’t menstruate, don’t worry about iron.

For more tailored advice on proper diet and supplementation, see a registered dietitian. All men may not be created equal — but they all have the potential to be super!

Author David Grotto is a FitStudio advisory board member, registered dietitian and the founder and president of Nutrition Housecall. He is the author of 101 Foods That Could Save Your Life and 101 Optimal Life Foods. He served as a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association for more than six years.

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Dear Guyatitian:

 Isn’t oil not that great for you? For example, I use Canola oil or the Smart Balance Omega Oil (it’s a blend of canola, soy and olive oil) because I thought they were the BETTER oils to use, but when I compared those to my regular old vegetable oil, everything was exactly the same – EXCEPT that the vegetable oil had 2 grams of Saturated Fat per serving, while the others only had 1 gram of Saturated Fat per serving.

 I also noticed that there are 120 fat calories per 1 tablespoon! 

YIKES! I know I’m eating more than one tablespoon of dressing on my salad, so am I just ruining my healthy salad by adding my oil based dressings to it?????

 Dear Fat-Phobe

Here’s the skinny on fat. Most “vegetable oil” is actually soybean oil. All of the oils you named, including soy oil, are excellent choices that can be used on salads, cooking, or baking. All are considered low in saturated fat (the stuff that can contribute to heart disease) and all are heart-healthy. So 2 grams of saturated fat versus 1 gram is no big whoop except if you are drowning your salad in oil!

On the positive side, fat helps promote satiety. Meaning, if the salad you ate had some oil-based dressing on it, it might tide you over longer than a fat free dressing. Also, recent research shows that adding a little fat to your salad actually helps maximize the absorption of the nutrients in your salad.

Now let’s talk calories. Whether you are talking a tablespoon of butter, oil or any other type of fat, they all have about the same amount of calories.

So no, I don’t think you are ruining your healthy salad by using oil-based dressings but you certainly can turn it unhealthy if you put on too much. Here’s a link to a video I did at Ponte Fresco restaurant in Chicago that illustrates this point.

 

If you are like me, who likes a salad a little ‘wet’, opt for a low-cal,reduced fat ( NOT fat free) dressing or use one of those mist spray dressings that cover every bite of salad with just enough dressing.

Yours in good health,

The Guyatitian

National Soyfoods Month

Posted: April 14, 2010 in Ask The Guyatitian
Tags: , ,

Just a quick note today to recommend this great website called soyfoodsmonth.org for great information on soy and great recipe ideas, too!

“Soyfoods are a nutritious option for children and busy families,” says Stacey Krawczyk, MS, RD, LDN, Research Dietitian for the National Soybean Research Laboratory. Unlike many other protein sources, soyfoods are cholesterol-free and low in saturated fat.”

Soyfoods are easy to prepare and simple to incorporate into your favorite dishes, making soyfoods a healthy choice that fits into any busy family schedule: 

  • Breakfast: Try soymilk on cereal or blended with fruit and oatmeal in a delicious smoothie.
  • Lunch: Try deli alternatives that taste great and offer all the benefits of soy.
  • Dinner: Meat alternatives are an easy way to add soyfoods to your menu. For a quick and easy dinner, try making tacos with soy crumbles in place of ground beef. You save on saturated fat and calories and they are ready in just minutes.
  • Snack: Soyfood snacks like whole soy nutrition bars, soy yogurt and soy pudding are perfect for active families looking for a variety of on-the-go options.
  • Any time: Traditional tofu can be used in any meal or desserts to decrease calories and provide a good source of complete protein.

More good news when it comes to soy! A new review study published in the current issue of Fertility & Sterility found that soy does not have feminizing effects on men.  The review examined published data from over 150 clinical studies to critically evaluate the effects of soy isoflavones on men.  Results show that soy food consumption has no effect on circulating levels of testosterone or estrogen, sperm count, semen quality, breast size or erectile function in men.  The bottom-line is that there is no evidence indicating that the isoflavones or other components of soy foods exert feminizing effects on men.

Ode to Soy!