Posts Tagged ‘fiber’

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As seen in WebMD Real Life Nutrition

What’s standing in the way of having the body you always wanted? Maybe it’s your kitchen!

After visiting hundreds of patients in their homes, I’ve stumbled on one undeniable fact: skinny people “do kitchens” differently than those who aren’t so svelte. And it’s not just that thin folks spend more face time with their kitchens, it’s what’s in their “skinny kitchens” that’s dramatically different than their weight-challenged counterparts. The kitchen, as it turns out, contains secrets that are the linchpin to long-term success in managing weight and health. So what are these secrets? I’ve narrowed them down into four key areas. This week, I’ll let you in on secret #1.

Skinny Secret #1: Stock a Skinny Pantry

Fill your pantry and fridge with these essentials to keep hunger at bay, belly bulges busted, and metabolisms boosted:

Hunger and Calorie-Blockers:
High-protein breakfast foods like eggs and Greek yogurt keep hunger at bay for hours compared to carb-laden breakfast choices.

High-fiber foods such as whole grains, cold or hot breakfast cereals, dried fruits, and fresh and frozen veggies are all excellent ingredients that can be added to most dishes to pump-up fiber and diminish calories from being absorbed in the digestive track.

Go nuts! Studies on nuts, especially almonds and pistachios, show amazing hunger-busting and fat-shedding effects for those who add them to their diets. Two studies showed that substances in nuts increase fecal excretion of calories when a handful of them are added to the diet. In fact, 55-75% of calories provided by nuts may not be fully absorbed. Research has also demonstrated that people who add nuts to their diet stick to their diets longer and achieve greater weight loss than those who forgo these foods.

Belly Bulge Busters:
Whole grains: In a study from Tufts University of nearly 3000 men and women, researchers found that adults who ate three or more serving of whole grains and limited refined grain items to 1 serving or less had 10 percent less belly fat than those who didn’t eat this way.

Resistant starch (RS) food sources such as firm bananas, beans and lentils, potatoes, pasta, rice, and certain whole grains such as corn contain RS which increases glucagon-like peptide-1, a major appetite suppressant hormone. RS also helps make insulin work better and regulates blood sugar – the key essentials to stopping the accumulation of belly fat and reducing the risk of “dia-besity”.

MUFAS, also known as monounsaturated fatty acids, are found in such foods as avocado, almonds, olive oil, and canola oil. MUFAs help eliminate belly fat, especially in insulin-resistant individuals.

Anti-Bloat ingredients such as parsley, fennel, cabbage, watermelon, watercress, celery, and cucumber are not only low in calories but have unique properties that rid the body of unwanted excess fluid. Many of my bloated patients were poor water consumers when I first began to work with them. Ironically, drinking more water helps the body’s natural fluid regulators, the kidneys, do a better job of managing water balance.

Metabolism Boosters
Coffee & tea and less of me: Beverages that contain caffeine and antioxidants called catechins have been found to help burn calories through thermogenesis (the creation of heat). They counteract the decrease in metabolism that often accompanies weight loss efforts. The overall effect may be small (less than 50 calories a day burned) but this can add up to nearly 5 pounds on the scale in the course of a year. Combine this intervention with other metabolic boosters such as physical activity and proper rest and the fat-burning potential is substantial!

Poly wants a crack at her. Research shows that fruits like apples, pears, grapefruit, and grapes, long associated with helping to manage weight, are rich in naturally occurring plant chemicals called polyphenols. These polyphenol-rich fruits decrease skinny-phobe bacteria called firmicutes that accumulate in the gut and contribute to weight gain. These fruits also increase friendly bacteria called bacteriodetes that break down polyphenols into helpful substances that boost the body’s metabolism. In one study, people who drank Concord grape juice daily lost weight compared to a control group that consumed a sugar-sweetened grape beverage and gained weight. It’s possible that the polyphenols in the grape juice helped keep the weight off among the drinkers of unsweetened grape juice.

Hot stuff. There’s a spice that’s just dying to rev-up your fat-burning engine but rarely sees the light of day in culinarily impaired kitchen cabinets: hot peppers! Capsaicin is the active ingredient in hot peppers that boosts metabolism and decreases appetite – not only in the meal that it’s eaten in, but even for the next few meals, according to recent research. Capsaicin can be found in paprika, chili, and cayenne pepper powder, as well as dozens of other hot pepper varieties.

I’ve put some of these tips together in a killer egg salad sandwich for you. Hope you like it. What else do YOU put in your kitchen to help keep the pounds away? I’d love to hear about it in the comment section.

Hunger-Busting Egg Salad Sandwich

Servings: Makes 4 sandwiches
Ingredients:
6 large eggs, hard boiled
3 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste
2 stalks celery, washed and chopped
½ red onion, diced
2 tablespoons pistachios, chopped
2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped
4 large romaine lettuce leaves
8 slices of hi-fiber whole grain bread, toasted

Directions:
Place eggs in a pot and cover with cold water. Bring to a gentle boil. Turn off heat, cover, and let sit for seven minutes. Meanwhile, fill a bowl with ice and water. When eggs are finished cooking, place them in the ice bath for three minutes. Remove eggs and peel them and then place in a medium mixing bowl. Add yogurt, mustard, lemon juice, and hot pepper sauce along with salt and pepper. Mash mixture with a fork, being careful to leave some texture. Stir in celery, onion, pistachios, and cilantro. Taste and add more hot sauce if you want more of a kick.
Toast bread. Spread mixture onto a slice of toast. Place lettuce leaf on top and cover with another slice of toast. Repeat for remaining sandwiches.

The Skinny
293 Calories, 13.7g Total Fat, 3g Saturated Fat, 317mg Cholesterol, 25g Carbs, 8g Fiber,
20g Protein, 495 mg Sodium

Poor Mr. Bean. He gets blamed for all the rumblings down below! Well, it doesn’t have to be that way. Besides,  what beans do for your health might well be worth striking up the band for. Sorry – couldn’t resist. Here’s my latest blog post featured on WebMD!

By David Grotto, RD, LDN aka “The Guyatitian”

When interviewed by other food and health journalists, I’m often asked what the one food I would demand if I had to be stuck on an island alone. My reply is usually, “Beans! And it might be best if I were alone on that island.” LOL! All kidding aside, bean consumption has been on the downturn for quite some time now and it may be because so many fear falling out of social graces from the resulting rumblings down below. But I think it may also have to do with the fact that so many younger adults simply don’t know what to do with them. So, I consider it my personal mission to set the record straight about beans and offer some really great information on why beans are so worth your while to include in your diet and give you some of my tasty tips on how to use them.

Lean on the Bean (for great health and nutrition)

With over 1000 varietals to choose from, beans are the highest protein and richest fiber source of any of the vegetables. That’s right – vegetable, NOT fruit! Bean consumption has also been associated with longevity, looser waist bands and healthier hearts. Boasting to be one of the richest sources of soluble fiber, beans have been shown to help lower the more harmful LDL cholesterol which high levels are a risk factor for heart disease. Beans are also a good source of potassium which helps in controlling blood pressure. Recent research has shown that a special type of carbohydrate called resistant starch may be helpful in fighting diabetes and controlling blood glucose (sugar).

Bean there, done that.

Maybe the health and nutrition benefits of beans aren’t enough of a convincer for you? Maybe you tried beans before and they just didn’t tickle your fancy? Perhaps you have texture issues? Okay then – well try these simple tips and stop being such a
bean-o-phobe! Go stealth!

  • Mix cooked beans and broth in a food processor until smooth. Pour into an ice cube tray and freeze. Add a frozen bean cube to hot soup or pasta sauce.
  • Add black beans to your favorite brownie mix – see recipe below.

Simple and tasty.

  • Add cooked/canned beans on top of any salad. Take canned salad beans and mix with green and wax beans. Add sweet vinaigrette dressing, coarse ground pepper and a bit of salt to taste. Voila! You’ve got three-bean salad.
  • Whip cooked beans into a pate and season with garlic, onion, pepper and a dash of salt for a great spread on crackers or serving with vegetable crudités.

Did someone step on a duck?

Hey – gas happens –perfectly natural. But if you want to keep the production of air caused by beans to a minimum, try these simple tips:

  • Eat more slowly. Swallowing air because you eat too fast is one of the main causes of gas.
  • Cook dry beans with a strip of kombu (seaweed). Kombu helps break down rafinose, the indigestible carbohydrate often associated with gas.
  • Rinse canned beans well before serving. You’ll also reduce the sodium content up to 40%!
  • Start small. Try eating 1 tablespoon of beans everyday and work your way up to the recommended three cups per week. The slow introduction of beans allows
    your digestive tract to produce friendly bacteria that offsets gas production.

View the rest of the article for a great bean brownie recipe…

And for your viewing pleasure, here’s an oldie but goodie of Barbie, Ken and Tot setting the record straight on the health benefits of beans. Enjoy!

Here’s my second post to WebMD’s Real Life Nutrition blog. Enjoy!

By David Grotto, RD, LDN aka “The Guyatitian”

I love potatoes. My family loves potatoes. My patients love potatoes. But none of us have needed to enroll in a twelve-step program to free ourselves from a terrible potato addiction. So why am I professing my love for spuds? Well, the lowly potato is once again being demonized for its supposed contribution to the obesity epidemic that is facing our nation’s children. So as it stands right now, the USDA has proposed to drastically limit the serving size of potatoes and other starchy vegetables which also includes corn, lima beans and peas in the national school lunch program. Yes, I’ve got my undies in a bundle over this one, folks.

Show me the money. I can honestly say, after being an RD for nearly two decades and after seeing hundreds if not thousands of patients (including many children), I have yet met anyone who has become obese from eating “too many” potatoes, alone. We sure like to hang our hat on one single food as the cause of our obesity problem in this country but the truth is, obesity is a complex issue.

Click on WebMD to see the rest of the article…

And for your viewing pleasure, Barbie continues to set the record straight when it comes to the health value of potatoes!